• EACH DAY OF THE YEARLIGHT CALENDAR IS REPRESENTED BY A CIRCULAR DIAGRAM, WHICH DEPICTS THE SITE-SPECIFIC DURATION OF DAYLIGHT, TWILIGHT, AND MOONLIGHT FOR THAT DAY. THESE DAYLIGHT DIAGRAMS ARE MADE UP OF THE FOLLOWING ELEMENTS:
  • SUN DATA



    Based on the latitude and longitude of your location, the horizon-specific timing of sunrise, sunset, local solar noon, as well as the transitions between civil, nautical, and astronomical twilight are calculated. These events/periods are depicted symbolically by lines and regions of color. For example, sunrise and sunset are represented by black lines while daylight is depicted by a region of white.
  • MOON DATA



    The white Moon-line runs between the horizon-specific timing of moonrise and moonset. By varying the Moon-line's opacity, the intensity of moonlight for each day is depicted. This corresponds with the phase of the Moon, ranging from a full moon, represented by a fully opaque line, to a new moon, represented by a transparent (0% opaque) line. This allows the calendar to depict how much moonlight is in the sky each night.
  • The Sun and Moon data are overlaid to produce a timeline of the day's sunlight and moonlight.
  • These daylight timelines then get mapped onto a circular, 24-hour analog clock face. Each day starts at the bottom (00:00) and proceeds clockwise around the circle. 12:00 (noon) occurs at the top of each diagram. In this way it is possible to approximate the timing of each event from the daylight diagrams.